HomeCompany Updates › 2013 Logging Season Taking Shape

2013 Logging Season Taking Shape

A nice 3-log load of residual Sugar Pine that survived the Barton Hill Fire in 1956, and came out of Hampshire Creek as part of the Empire North Log Sale.
A nice 3-log load of residual Sugar Pine that survived the Barton Hill Fire in 1956, and came out of Hampshire Creek as part of the Empire North Log Sale.

A nice 3-log load of residual Sugar Pine that survived the Barton Hill Fire in 1956, and came out of Hampshire Creek as part of the Empire North Log Sale

July 2013, Ryan McKillop, Inventory Forester –

Since our logging season started this year back in April, production has been fairly steady, with the exception of a few days lost to wet weather and a few more to dangerously dry “red-flag” conditions.

So far, so good, and with no accidents to our personnel to boot! No doubt we will lose some more days this year to high and/or extreme fire danger, but it looks like we are still on track to hit this year’s production goal. Through the end of June, we have delivered 9 million board feet, with a number of decks still in the woods.

This year seems a little unusual in that we are active in so many different areas and so many different projects.

This year’s volume is being generated from 10 different Timber Harvest Plans (THP’s). We have operations going in Humboldt, Mendocino, Sonoma, Butte, Yuba and Plumas Counties and possibly Sierra County later in the season as well.

This might be a company record in terms of the number of different loggers and log destinations, although the slowly recovering housing industry is certainly not stellar for log prices!

A rare glimpse of two consecutive 3-log loads coming out of Section 1 at Hampshire Creek

A rare glimpse of two consecutive 3-log loads coming out of Section 1 at Hampshire Creek

With the mainside now having wrapped up the Empire North and South projects, they are pushing on up the hill to the cooler elevation Bradley property and then on to Gibsonville Ridge.

Part of the Empire North sale area was across from the office in Section 1, which was the stand that the Barton Hill Fire burned through in 1956. The area was re-planted by Soper crews starting in 1957, and is one of our earliest plantations on record.

Today, even after having just logged through it, the area is growing exceptionally well, a testament of what good site quality and sound management can achieve.

For example, when I looked at cruise plot information, I discovered that 12 years ago, the average stand volume was 7,500 board feet per acre. Just prior to logging this year, it had grown to almost 24,000 board feet per acre, a 300% increase in volume in 12 years!

Robinson Enterprises logging a cable clearcut with one of their Washington yarders just north of Lost Creek Reservoir

Robinson Enterprises logging a cable site with one of their Washington yarders just north of Lost Creek Reservoir

Robinson Enterprises is operating a Washington yarder on our Lost Creek Cable Log Sale this year. It’s been a few years since we’ve had a yarder in these parts.

The expected volume of 3.8 million board feet will likely keep them busy for the remainder of this season, and possibly into next year as well.

Robinson started on the north side of Lost Creek Reservoir and will be moving over to a unit on Jackass Flat, and then on into the northern part of the Lost Creek basin.

Comments are closed.